fall 2019

Philosophy

of the

Encounter

Tatiana Istomina

August 26 – November 12

[ LECTURE ] JCM 2121

November 5, 5 – 6 P.M.

Philosophy of the Encounter (2016–18) by Tatiana Istomina is based on the story of Hélène Rytman, who was murdered by her husband, the prominent philosopher Louis Althusser, in 1980. Althusser’s texts continue to be appreciated while Rytman has been forgotten despite her role in Althusser’s life and influence on his intellectual career. In death, as in life, Rytman is silenced—an insignificant woman lost in the shadow of her famous husband. Istomina reconstructs their story from Hélène’s point of view and explores the implications of these events on Althusser's philosophical theories. Never before seen together in its entirety, Philosophy of the Encounter is a multi-media body of work consisting of sculptures made in collaboration with artist Mona Sharma, a puppet-performance staged for video, works on paper, and an artist book. 

Tatiana Istomina is a Russian-born multi-media artist and writer living in New York. Her projects have been featured in exhibitions across the United States and abroad, including the Moscow Museum of Modern Art, Blue Star Contemporary, The Drawing Center, the Bronx Museum, Gaîté Lyrique, and the Haus der Kulturen der Welt. She is a recipient of numerous awards, including the AAF Prize for Fine Arts, a Joan Mitchell Foundation grant, Ruth and Harold Chenven Foundation grant, Puffin Foundation grant, and the Spillways Fellowship. Istomina holds a PhD in Geophysics from Yale University and an MFA from Parsons New School. She is also a contributor to several art magazines, including Art in America, Hyperallergic, and Brooklyn Rail.

 
Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson,  East Coast, West Coast  (film still), 1969. Courtesy of the Holt/Smithson Foundation and Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York.

Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson, East Coast, West Coast (film still), 1969. Courtesy of the Holt/Smithson Foundation and Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York.

1969 / 2019:

“Real” Time Systems

August 26 – September 29

In the September 1969 issue of Art Forum, artist and art critic Jack Burnham published “Real Time Systems,” in which he asserts that, “There are two kinds of artists: those who work within the art system, and those few who work with the art system.” The article, a follow-up to his 1968 essay “Systems Esthetics,” characterizes art not in terms of a medium or a subject but rather in terms of the artist’s production of artwork relative to the “real time systems” that govern how we see and understand the world. The term “system” gained currency, as evidenced by its reoccurring use in Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson’s 1969 film East Coast, West Coast, wherein the artists playfully perform two seemingly opposed points of view: the intellectualism of a conceptual east coast artist and the pragmatism of a free-thinking west coast artist. Paired here, the ideas outlined in Burnham’s essay and parodied in Holt and Smithson’s film resonate more than ever, a half-century later.

 
Jennifer Masley,  A Cord , 2019, glazed earthenware, 9 1/2 x 9 1/2 x 19 inches.

Jennifer Masley, A Cord, 2019, glazed earthenware, 9 1/2 x 9 1/2 x 19 inches.

Every Ware

October 14 – November 12

[ Panel & Opening ]

October 14, 5 – 7 P.M.

Every year, Texas State Galleries hosts an exhibition of works by alumni from the School of Art and Design at Texas State University. This year’s exhibition showcases art made by alumni who graduated with a concentration in Ceramics. Every Ware is co-curated by Faculty Emerita Michel Conroy and Assistant Professor Jennifer Datchuk, with assistance from Alumnus and Lecturer Tom May. It features works by Lindsey Browning, Sawyer Hewitt, Gabo Martini, Jennifer Masely, Tom May, Georgia Ruiz Davis, Carol Schwartz, Jerry Solomon, Melody Tiemann, Leandra Urrutia, Nick Weddell, and Kyle White, as well as works by Michel Conroy and Jennifer Datchuk.

 
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B.F.A. Thesis Exhibitions

December 2 – 13, 2019