Fall 2017

 
 
Texas 14 November 2000, One Jar of Dill Pickles, c. 2001. From Julie Green, The Last Supper: 700 Plates Illustrating Final Meals of U.S. Death Row Inmates, 2000 – ongoing.

Texas 14 November 2000, One Jar of Dill Pickles, c. 2001. From Julie Green, The Last Supper: 700 Plates Illustrating Final Meals of U.S. Death Row Inmates, 2000 – ongoing.

 
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The Last Supper: 

700 Plates Illustrating Final Meals of U.S. Death Row Inmates 

Julie Green

August 28 - November 10

Opening Reception August 30, 5 - 6 p.m.

In 1999, Julie Green was struck by an account in the newspaper of a death row inmate’s last meal. Since then, Green has painted the final meals of over 700 death row inmates onto individual kiln-fired ceramic plates. She plans to add fifty plates a year until capital punishment is abolished in the United States.

The meal requests, which reflect region, race, and economic background, humanize the men and women on death row. Employees at the Indiana Department of Corrections once recalled a person’s request: “He told us he never had a birthday cake so we ordered a birthday cake for him.” In states with meal options, selections are modest—limited to what is already available in the prison kitchen. None of the states allow alcohol. Cigarettes, though technically banned, are sometimes granted.

The Last Supper has particular meaning for Texas, which carries out the largest number of executions in the United States. It is the only death penalty state that does not allow a meal selection, serving only the standard prison meal of the day.

Julie Green is a professor of art at Oregon State University and is represented by Upfor Gallery in Portland, Oregon. The Last Supper project has been featured on PBS, in The New York Times and on National Public Radio. In the ten years that have passed since the exhibition was last shown in Texas (DiverseWorks, 2007), the number of plates has increased threefold.

 

The [ Last Supper ] Lecture Series

In conjunction with Julie Green's The Last Supper: 700 Plates Illustrating Final Meals of U.S. Death Row Inmates, the Texas State Galleries are hosting a series of conversations relevant to the 2017–2018 Common Experience theme, The Search for Justice: Our Response to Crime in the 21st Century.

Aja Segapeli, San Elizario El Paso, 2016.

Aja Segapeli, San Elizario El Paso, 2016.

We Are a Camera

October 23 – November 17

Opening October 23, 5 - 6 p.m.

We Are a Camera features the video work of Christina Patino Sukhgian Houle, Paulina Mendoza, and Aja Segapeli, all alumni of the School of Art and Design at Texas State University. The title refers both to the pervasive act of using a camera lens to mediate one’s experience of the world, and to the necessity for individuals to act collectively by using cameras to document and make public singular experiences of discrimination. Artists included in this exhibition explore how moving images enable the construction of identity, as well as how they might be used to reconcile identity issues for a larger public. We Are a Camera is curated by Kaytlin Esparza, a junior art history student at Texas State University and Spring 2016 Texas State Galleries Intern.

 
John Muehl, Aggressive Observation, 2016, Brass, glass, forged steel, resin, moth specimen. 2016 School of Art and Design BFA Thesis Exhibition.

John Muehl, Aggressive Observation, 2016, Brass, glass, forged steel, resin, moth specimen. 2016 School of Art and Design BFA Thesis Exhibition.

School of Art and Design
BFA Thesis Exhibitions

November 27 – December 15

Students earning a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the School of Art and Design at Texas State University are required to exhibit art work created in their thesis semester. The BFA Thesis Exhibitions, entirely conceived and executed by the thesis students, highlight the depth and range of School of Art and Design students and their creative practice.

 
Now on view: Ann Hamilton, Fly Together.

Now on view: Ann Hamilton, Fly Together.

Pledges of Allegiance

November 2017 - July 2018

Pledges of Allegiance is a nationwide public art project by Creative Time. The project is a serialized commission of sixteen flags, each created by acclaimed contemporary artists: Tania Bruguera, Alex Da Corte, Jeremy Deller, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Ann Hamilton, Robert Longo, Josephine Meckseper, Marilyn Minter, Vik Muniz, Jayson Musson, Ahmet Ögüt, Yoko Ono, Trevor Paglen, Pedro Reyes, Rirkrit Tiravanija, and Nari Ward.

Each flag embodies art’s ability to channel political passion, providing a unifying symbol around which to unite, as well as a call-to-action for institutions nationwide to raise upcoming Pledges of Allegiance flags in solidarity with Creative Time.

Pledges of Allegiance aims to inspire a sense of community among cultural institutions, beginning with an urgent articulation of the political demands of the moment. Each flag points to an issue the artist is passionate about or a cause they believe is worth fighting for, and speaks to how we might move forward collectively as a country.

Pledges of Allegiance was originally conceived by Alix Browne and developed in collaboration with Cian Browne, Fabienne Stephan, and Opening Ceremony.


The installation of Pledges of Allegiance at Texas State Galleries is generously supported by contributions from the Center for Diversity and Gender Studies at Texas State University. To share this project on social media, please use #PledgesofAllegiance.